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Finding your Labradoodle should be an easy, stress free experience for you and your puppy.  We strive to place each of our puppies in a home that is well suited where s/he will meet the owner’s expectations and the owners will provide the perfect home that matches the puppy’s personality and needs.  To help with this process, we ask that you complete a brief application to formalize your interest in one of our puppies.  You completing the application does not bind you or us to a contract. 

 

This will benefit both the new owner and pup. If for some reason your application is denied you may try again in 12 months. We take placing a puppy very seriously and hope you understand our process.

 

Getting started

  • What is a Labradoodle?
    It’s not surprising that the Labradoodle has gained such popularity so quickly. Originally developed to be hypoallergenic guide dogs, the first planned crosses of Poodles and Labrador Retrievers were arranged by the Royal Guide Dogs Association of Australia. The result was a smart and sociable dog who not only possessed a nature appropriate for guide dogs but also had a low-shedding coat. While the hybrid is not yet achieving consistent results in coat or temperament, she is a wildly popular and affectionate dog. Chances are good that you’ve met a Labradoodle lately. These fuzzy poodle-Labrador hybrids are a common sight at your local dog park, looking for all the world like living teddy bears. So just what’s behind all the Labradoodle love? Though it seems like those adorable, fuzzy “doodle” dogs have been around forever, they were actually only introduced in 1988. Bred to be a hypoallergenic service dog, the Labradoodle went on to prove that she could also be a versatile family and therapy dog as well.
  • How is the Labradoodle's temperament?
    Social and sweet, Labradoodles are lucky enough to possess many of the best qualities of Labradors and poodles. They adore being with people and are typically quite affectionate (even with strangers). Labradoodle puppies are playful and bouncy, always ready for adventure—and a cuddle. Enjoying strong popularity in short order, this "designer" hybrid became well known quickly. A Labradoodle is happiest when she's with the people s/he loves, and s/he'll shower her family with affection and devotion.
  • How are Labradoodles with children?
    Labradoodles quickly become an essential part of the family. They’re particularly wonderful with children—loving, and yet oozing with energy. Training and supervision is essential, though. They might accidentally knock your little one over if they get too excited. The Labradoodle does well with children and can be an affectionate and gentle companion for any child. She can also be exuberant and might knock down smaller children, but she will love them with all her heart. As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child. Labradoodles usually get along well with other dogs and pets. Like most dogs, they need training and socialization for optimum success at living with and visiting other animals.
  • What would my Labradoodle look like?
    Labradoodles come in a variety of colors, from cream to chocolate, apricot, red, black, silver, or a mix of hues. Their fur can also vary, with some rocking wavy coats (the most popular style), and others sporting curly, wiry, or straight hair.
  • What are the vital stats of a Labradoodle?
    Dog Breed Group: Hybrid Dogs Height: 1 foot, 9 inches to 2 feet tall at the shoulder Weight: 50 to 65 pounds Life Span: 12 to 14 years
  • Is this a high maintenance fur-baby?
    A Labradoodle needs one or two brushings per week, as well as regular grooming that includes ear cleaning and nail clipping. The Labradoodle can be a high-energy dog. She requires about 30 to 60 minutes of exercise per day. Labradoodles are intelligent and need to be mentally and physically stimulated. If they aren't, they can become destructive and hard to handle. Labradoodles do well with other dogs and pets. Apartments are not the ideal setting for this energetic dog. First-time owners do well with the friendly and amenable Labradoodle.
  • What is the feeding recommendation?
    Recommended daily amount: 1 to 2.5 cups of high-quality dry food a day, divided into two meals. NOTE: How much your adult dog eats depends on her size, age, build, metabolism, and activity level. Dogs are individuals, just like people, and they don't all need the same amount of food. It almost goes without saying that a highly active dog will need more than a couch potato dog. The quality of dog food you buy also makes a difference--the better the dog food, the further it will go toward nourishing your dog and the less of it you'll need to shake into your dog's bowl. Keep your Labradoodle in good shape by measuring her food and feeding her twice a day rather than leaving food out all the time. If you're unsure whether she's overweight, give her the eye test and the hands-on test. First, look down at her. You should be able to see a waist. Then place your hands on her back, thumbs along the spine, with the fingers spread downward. You should be able to feel but not see her ribs without having to press hard. If you can't, she needs less food and more exercise. Dividing your Labradoodle's food into two or more meals per day instead of a big bowl once a day can also lower her risk of gastric torsion, also known as bloat. The Labrador Retriever can suffer from this condition, and it's a trait that can be easily passed on to any Labradoodle offspring. For more on feeding your Labradoodle, see our guidelines for buying the right food, feeding your puppy, and feeding your adult dog.
  • Is the Labradoodle Hypo-allergenic?
    Australian Labradoodles have an allergy friendly coat but this unfortunately does not mean that everyone with a dog allergy will tolerate an Australian Labradoodle. It is possible to be allergic to saliva, urine, hair or dander and each person’s allergy is slightly different. Our experience shows that a large percentage of people with dog allergies do not react to Australian Labradoodles, but this does not apply to everyone. On occasions you may find that you react when your puppy comes home. This may be because of allergens that the puppy has picked up through contact with another animal (a dog or cat in the breeders home, at the vet’s office etc). If this is the case, you will see a vast improvement after bathing the puppy. Other Labradoodles (Origin, Early Generation, British, American) tend to have hair coats which DO SHED to varying degrees and are therefore not suitable for allergy and asthma sufferers.
  • What is the Labradoodle's Lifespan?
    It is expected that a healthy Labradoodle should live between 13 and 16 years. As with any breed, there are environmental factorts that can extend or shorten the expected lifespan.
  • What type of social skills do the puppies have before they are homed?
    Hours and hours are spent socialising and interacting with our puppies to make sure that they are ready to make the transition to your home. Unlike many other breeders, we treat furbabies like family, they play with our children, climb stairs!, go for a swim and socialize daily.
  • Labby coat, fleecy coat, woolly coat...how do I decide what I want?"
    A labby (hair) coat is very low maintenance as far as brushing and grooming time. They do, however, usually shed some. The fleecier coats are OFTEN (not always) lower shedding, but require more grooming time to avoid matting. Wool coats are often allergy-friendly and low shedding, but require a lot of grooming to avoid matting. There are full coated, upper generation dogs that are NOT woolly but ARE allergy-friendly and low shedding. It takes an experienced breeder to recognize this. In any case, it is a personal decision about where you will spend your time in terms of dealing with dog hair...either in grooming the dog or cleaning up the hair it leaves behind on your clothes and floor.
Adopton question

going home

going home

Worming + first parvo vaccination

Puppies' first shots will be administered before puppy goes to their new home

registered microchipping

Your new puppy should be implanted and registered with a microchip at your first vet visit. Micro chipping is important in case you ever lose your puppy, (s)he will always have your information with them.

TWO YEar Health Warranty

See Contract for conditions of warranty.

Early potty training

Puppies are potty trained beginning at three weeks. Puppies are trained using the Misty Method.

new human coaching

Tiffany is certified dog trainer, we provide answers to the questions you may have about owning a new puppy to help you get started.

VET CHECK RESULTS

Puppies will be taken to the vet between 4 and 5 weeks to get their routine health check and their first set of vaccines. 

Progress folder

From the day you have chosen your puppy to the day puppy goes home, photos and weekly reports are sent to new owners. 

gift basket

Everything you need for a smooth, happy transition; Puppy blanket, toy and starter food included with all above item.

early scent introduction

Between three days to sixteen days, puppies are introduced to three to five different scents daily in order to help develop puppies' sensory function. The training is also helpful if you plan to use your dog for bird hunting retrieval, nose work, K9 or service work. 

Early Neurological StimulI Testing + Results

Beginning at three days after birth, each puppy is trained daily to ensure proper neurological development. Early neurological training helps to improve cardio vascular performance, build stronger heart beats and adrenal glands, gain more tolerance to stress and a greater resistance to disease. 

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